Top 10 Cities & States for Job Growth Rate

The 4-Hour Workweek: Escape 9-5, Live Anywhere, and Join the New Rich by Timothy Ferris

Some cities and states offer more than a place to work.  They offer high job growth rate and long-term career security. What are the top states and cities?

Studies from the Arizona State University W. P. Carey School of Business give interesting information that helps us find answers to those questions.

ASU’s Top 10 Cities for Job Growth Rate

ASU’s Top 10 States for Job Growth Rate

Maps based on Arizona State University W. P. Carey School of Business studies.

Job Opportunity City of The Week: Houston, TX

Houston
Job Opportunity City of The Week: Houston, TX

Houston Area Employment — October 2013, Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics Report

“Total nonfarm employment in the Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown Metropolitan Statistical Area stood at 2,812,500 in October 2013, up 79,600 from one year earlier, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. From October 2012 to October 2013, local nonfarm employment rose 2.9 percent, above the national increase of 1.7 percent. Regional Commissioner Stanley W. Suchman noted that among the 12 largest metropolitan areas in the country, Houston ranked second in the rate of job growth. (See chart 1 and table 1; Technical Note at end of release contains metropolitan area definitions. All data in this release are not seasonally adjusted; accordingly, over-the-year analysis is used throughout.)”

Houston Non Farm Employment

Source: http://www.bls.gov/regions/southwest/news-release/AreaEmployment_Houston.htm#tab1

Supersector Employment Houston

Source: http://www.bls.gov/regions/southwest/news-release/AreaEmployment_Houston.htm#tab1

Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, TX

Data Series Oct
2013
Nov
2013
Dec
2013
Civilian Labor Force 
3,102.5 3,127.7  3,131.6
Employment 2,920.5 2,951.0  2,960.5
Unemployment 182.0 176.7  171.1
Unemployment Rate 
5.9 5.6  5.5

Image Credit: Henry Han/Wikipedia.org

Job Opportunity City Of The Week, Kansas City, MO-KS

Kansas City

According to the Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Kansas City, MO-KS, ranks 115th out of 372 metropolitan areas in the United States.  The Kansas City, MO-KS Metropolitan Statistical Area unemployment dropped from 5.4% to a seasonally adjusted rate of 4.9%.  (1)

Kansas City is setting a good pace for the rest of the nation by moving up from an unemployment rate of 5.9% in July 2013, and has risen at a steady pace since August 2013.

Bureau of Labor, Economy at Glance (2)
Kansas City, MO-KS

Data Dates

 Oct
2013
 Nov
2013
 Dec
2013

Civilian Labor Force

 1,487.9  1,487.7   1,487.4

Employment

1,405.2 1,411.4  1,414.8

Unemployment

82.8 76.3   72.6

Unemployment Rate

5.6 5.1   4.9

Image:Henri-Léon Gréber/Wikipedia.org

5 Things Not To Discuss In The Workplace

5 Things Not To Discuss In The Workplace

5 Things Not To Discuss In The Workplace

What we say and how we say it defines who we are.

If we say things that offend people at work or in our businesses, we hurt our co-workers, our employees, our employers, and ourselves.

Great sports teams, great companies, and the military instill beliefs in the purpose of the institution and the process. They create focus. They create commitment, loyalty, and enthusiasm. They create esprit de corps.

The purpose of the workplace is to work.

When team members talk about the job and how to do that job, they become efficient.  Their minds clear.  They create solutions.  They innovate.  They become successful.  They treat obstacles as team opportunities.

Some things that people say create an awareness of differences. These things weaken the bonds in the workplace. They are combustible. They spark fires based in personal beliefs.  They break down the team.

1. Politics has the potential to spark fires.  Have you ever noticed how some people ignite when you mention a political subject?  Often these people will say the same the thing they said the last time the discussion turned to politics.  Their mind goes to exactly the same point where it went before.  There is no discussion.  These people play an audio recording stored in their brain.  Even people who hold the same political belief can misunderstand the point of view of similarly minded people.  They have different memories of the same subject, and these different recordings create separation among people.

2. Religion often has the same effect on people as politics.  For many people, religious discussions immediately create hard feelings.  When mixed with discussions of politics, religion can melt teams completely.

3. Race, ethnicity, and culture are incredibly complicated, divisive topics.  Team members need to have confidence in their value as a member of the team.  Discussing race, ethnicity, or culture creates an awareness of our differences.  These topics connect to our brain in the areas of self-esteem and feelings of self-worth.  In a workplace, where everyone needs to come together to focus on the common good of the team, discussions of race, ethnicity, or culture can create a threatening sense of hierarchy and a false sense of entitlement.

4. The topic of sex has more than one facet.

  • Sexual orientation: Do not discuss sexual orientation in the workplace.
  • Sexual discrimination:  Women still face challenges in getting equal pay and equal opportunity.  However, there are companies like Facebook and Yahoo that have that have shown that a person’s performance is more important to the success of a company than a person’s gender.
  • Sexual harassment: This practice is ugly.  During my thirty years of recruiting, I have known people who have lost their job without warning for sexual harassment.

5. Personal problems make doing a job more difficult.  Discussing your personal problems in the workplace creates risks to you as an employee.  Some companies have the resources to help employees deal with family, financial, mental, substance abuse, and emotional issues.  However, these matters are private.  If a company is going to get involved in these issues, the best companies refer their employees to professionals in those fields.  If you need help with these issues, you might seek professional help before you discuss personal issues at work.

Work is fun.  Work brings meaning to our lives.  In the workplace, we create bonds of loyalty, enthusiasm, and commitment.  We can experience esprit de corps.  We have this experience through focusing on the job and avoiding discussions that separate us from our co-workers.  We can bring power to the workplace through focusing on the job and our similarities and not our differences.

Image: Vladimirova/Flickr

Job Opportunity City Of The Week: New York City

Manhattan
Photo Credit: David Shankbone.

United States Department of Labor – Bureau of Labor Statistics
DOL/BLS Economy at a Glance(1)

New York-White Plains-Wayne, NY-NJ

Data Series Oct
2013
Nov
2013
Dec
2013
Civilian Labor Force  5,787.0 5,779.1  5,742.4
Employment  5,301.2  5,345.7  5,334.7
Unemployment    485.8   433.3   407.6
Unemployment Rate   8.4   7.5   7.1

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Job Opportunity City of the Week: Denver, CO

Denver
United States Department of Labor – Bureau of Labor Statistics

Economy at a Glance
Denver-Aurora-Broomfield, CO

Data Series July
2013
Aug
2013
Sept
2013
Oct
2013
Nov
2013
Civilian Labor Force 1,446.5 1,450.9 1,446.1 1,437.4   1,432.9
Employment 1,349.0 1,356.5 1,353.4 1,350.6   1,349.1
Unemployment 97.5 94.4 92.7 86.7   83.8
Unemployment Rate 6.7 6.5 6.4 6.0   5.8

Photo credit: Photo copyright holder listed as hogs555.  Documentation license in no way implies an endorsement of JayWren.com.  Source Wikipedia.org.

 

Job Opportunity City of the Week: Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, CA

SanInHills2
Shandin Hills San Bernadino Credit Wikipedia.org

Find Jobs in Riverside, San Bernardino, Ontario.

Census Bureau Quick Facts

San Bernardino County
Population 2,081,313
Per capita income $21,932
Median household income $55,853

Riverside County
County Population 2,268,783
Per capita income $24,516
Median household income $58,365

Largest Cities-Wikipedia.org
Riverside (303,871)
San Bernardino (209,924)
Fontana (196,069)
Moreno Valley (193,365)
Rancho Cucamonga (165,269)
Ontario (163,924)
Corona (152,374)
Victorville (115,903)
Murrieta (103,466)
Temecula (100,096)

Department of Labor
The Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, CA Metropolitan Statistical Area (the Inland Empire) has an unemployment rate of 9.6%.