in
Let's Connect
_____________________
Ask Me Anything
_____________________

From Strategy to Execution

From Strategy to Execution
My experiences as a Navy officer and in sales at Procter & Gamble and Polaroid Corporation were very positive when executing strategy.

In these organizations, everyone had specific tasks as part of their job function. When we implemented strategy, each department responded by doing their role in the strategy execution.

Interestingly enough, each of these organizations had very independent silos where departments did not spend a lot of time talking with each other once the strategy went into the execution phase. Everyone already knew what to do.

During strategy development, heads of the separate departments would create interdepartmental teams to work out the strategy.  In the execution phase, however, the teams worked on their specific departmental tasks.  This process allowed each person to focus on that person’s job.

The rigidity was these silos was a matter of strict procedural direction. People in each department did what their job description instructed them to do. I was in sales. I never picked up the phone and called the marketing department or the research and development department.

However, these organizations had a communications system to move feedback to the right people. In the Navy, everything went through the commanding officer. It was the commanding officer’s job to direct the information to the correct department for execution.

To execute across departments, the head of each department would coordinate the their immediate supervisor, who was the ship’s number two in command, the executive officer.

The commanding officer also had an executive officer. This person’s job was to hold meetings with the head of each department or silo to keep critical, prompt execution on track and on schedule. However, the department heads did not speak directly with each other. This type of communication would have created complications in the communications system. The information would likely only reach the two departments but not reach the commanding officer who was directing the execution. Therefore, the department heads took all their communication back through the executive officer who supported the captain in making command execution decisions.

From strategy to execution: This management process saved time. In my role in sales, I did not spend time talking with other departments. I spent my time doing my job in the execution of the strategy.

Image: Got Credit/Flickr

Winning Websites with Google Mobile

Winning with Google Mobile and Maps too

If you use a website for your career or your business, you might find this blog post helpful.

Google recently made major changes in their algorithm. Google designed the new algorithm to do a number of things. Here are three of them.

To return results on websites based on the relevance of the …More»

Are You Your Greatest Asset?

Are You Your Greatest Asset?

Are You Your Greatest Asset?

There is an old saying that originated on Wall Street: “The assets go up and down with the elevator every day.” Despite all the advances in technology, the people who run the machines, provide the services, and continue to create new products and services are valued company …More»

You Cannot Judge a Story by Its Title

You Cannot Judge a Story by Its Title

You cannot judge a story by its title.

Nor can you know the level of responsibility by the job title.

I read a business article the other day. The title was something like why business leaders should listen to teenagers.

When I read the article, I found that the content was not only …More»

How to Help Employers Find You

How to Help Employers Find You

How to help employers find you is the same as how retailers, manufacturers, and service providers help shoppers find them.

Retailers, manufacturers, and service providers put their name out there. They run ads in the newspaper. They do direct mail campaigns. They do telemarketing campaigns. They offer coupons and discounts with deadlines and …More»

6 Steps to a Winning Career

6 Steps to a Winning Career

Here are 6 steps to a winning career.

Arrive early.

“Better three hours too soon than five minutes late.” William Shakespeare

If you cannot be at work on time, you are unemployable. That idea seems simple enough. The best way to be at work on time is to go to your work before …More»